The World of Plants

a little database

Phloem

Phloem

In vascular plants, phloem is the living tissue that carries organic nutrients (known as photosynthate), particularly sucrose, a sugar, to all parts of the plant where needed.

The main conducting elements of the phloem are the sieve elements, of which there are two different types: sieve cells and sieve-tube members.
Sieve cells have narrow pores, their sieve areas are quite uniform in structure, and they are distributed evenly on all walls. One of the principal differences between sieve cells and sieve-tube members is the presence of sieve plates in sieve-tube members, that are absent in sieve cells.
Sieve cells are the only type of food-conducting cells in most seedless vascular plants and gymnosperms, whereas in angiosperms only sieve-tube members are present. Sieve-tube members occur end-on-end in longitudinal series called sieve tubes. They are in contact via plasmodesmata.
Typically, the final walls are interspersed with primary pit areas (groups of plasmodesmata), that later on develop into sieve plates. Sieve tubes in the phloem of angiosperms are flanked by one or several plasma-rich, nucleated companion cells, that do not occur in gymnosperms.

 

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December 26, 2010 Posted by | Phloem, PLANT PHYSIOLOGY | Leave a comment